Seven Tips for Selecting an Asperger’s Syndrome Therapist

It can often be helpful for those with Asperger’s syndrome or high-functioning autism to have a respected and knowledgeable therapist to help them process their emotions and understand more social nuances, among other things. People with Asperger’s syndrome often have trouble understanding the world around them, and as a result often carry around a lot of frustration. They might have resentment from ways they were treated in the past that they don’t understand.  Visit online https://ifftb.com/ for more detailsBut what kind of psychotherapist would be most effective for someone with Asperger’s syndrome or high functioning autism?

There are many different types of therapists out there. Many believe that the best therapists tend to be the ones who don’t subscribe to any particular theory, but instead use a variety of therapies depending on what they think will help each individual client.

Seek Empathy and a Connection in a Therapist for Asperger’s Syndrome

You don’t want a therapist that makes you feel like you’re talking to a wall and never gives you much of a response to anything. You don’t want a therapist whose only contribution is to say “And how does that make you feel?” occasionally. While it’s not bad to help you try to get to your emotions, they need to help teach you how to deal with the emotions, too. It’s too easy for some therapists to just sit back and do nothing. Most children, teenagers and adults with autism need to be taught and given tips on how to process feelings and improve their communication. Seek a therapist who has this approach.

Top 7 Criteria for a Therapist for treating Asperger’s Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

1. Engagement – You do want a therapist who is as engaged with you as possible.

They are asking questions, they are listening to your answers and showing they are listening (perhaps by repeating what you have said or some sort of verbal clue), and they are asking intelligent follow-up questions. Most children, teenagers and adults with Asperger’s syndrome need to be constantly engaged in a social interaction in order to stay attentive and interested in what’s going on.

2. Experience – It helps if the therapist has an intimate knowledge of Asperger’s syndrome.

There are too many therapists who, knowing little or nothing about Asperger’s, will attribute your social problems or anxiety to everything but what is really causing it. That’s not helpful. In fact, it’s a waste of your time. They will also fail to understand when you talk about how you see the world, because in all likelihood, they haven’t spent a lot of time looking at the world in that way.

Now, this is not to say that all therapists without experience with Asperger’s syndrome patients are ineffective, but they have to be willing to learn. And sometimes, you have to be willing to teach them. Don’t stick with anyone who refuses to open their mind to your way of thinking.